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Isabel

Even today, women with post-partum depression aren't really believed.

Interesting insights from the author and you.

J.C. Montgomery (The Biblio Brat)

This was a story which I read in college. The class was "Themes In Literature" and the theme for that semester was 'Descent Into Madness'. I must say, for such a short story, it generated a lively and enlightening discussion. Since then, I too have sought out and read other stories by this author. It has been worth the effort. I know you will feel the same.

Danielle

Isabel--I think you're right actually--I think sometimes they are not taken as seriously as they should be. Hopefully not everyone thinks that way now, though.
J.C.--That sounds like an interesting class. Do you remember the other texts you read? I think this story is going to stick with me for a while, and I plan on finding an anthology of her other work as well.

Lisa the Librarian

I too have missed quite a few of the classic works that everyone seems to have read. I just read The Yellow Wallpaper in the last several months and really liked it. I agree that this would be a good story to include in a broader discussion. I got so very frustrated reading this. At times I wanted to shake her, and I always wanted to choke John.

chihiro

This is a story I've wanted to read for quite a long time but somehow never grabbed for it. Thanks for your great review, I'm sure I'll read the story soon.

Dorothy W.

This is a great story -- I've taught it a time or two and the students liked it (although some were bewildered by it ...). It's so horrifying to think of what such a life would have been like -- the character's or Gilman's. To have a doctor tell you to have only two hours intellectual life a day!

Ted

I haven't read this one either but, like you, had heard about it. Sounds like a very contemporary story!

Litlove

Ohhh, I can't bear to think about all the classic works of literature I have never read! There's just so many! I loved your review of this, Danielle, it's just perfect. If you do find anything else by her I'll be very interested as I would like to read more of her work myself!

Kate S.

"The Yellow Wallpaper" is one of my favourites. If you want to read more Gilman, you might try "Herland" which is essentially a feminist utopian novel (though I don't think the term "feminist" was much in play at the time it was written!). It's very different from "The Yellow Wallpaper," not as well written in my estimation, but fascinating all the same. I've also read excerpts from one of her non-fiction books, "Women and Economics." I don't remember it well enough to recommend it, but I'm struck in thinking of these three works simultaneously by the breadth of Gilman's interests and accomplishements and by how extraordinarily ahead of her time she was.

Danielle

Lisa--This was really an excellent story. It was sad how dismissive her husband was to any of her wishes. It seems only *he* knew what was right for her and she had no input. Scary.
Chihiro--It is fast reading and you can even find it online at Project Gutenberg, which is where I read it. Now I think I want to get a book of her work, though.
Dorothy--It would have been a very stifling existence. I hope it wasn't like this for every woman. No wonder it was so hard to break free. It would be a great story to teach, I imagine there would be lots of discussion!
Ted--It's a quick read--I really recommend it! It certainly shows how far we've come.
Litlove--I'm so glad you posted on this as that is what prompted me to pick it up. I think it will be impossible to read all the classic works--no matter how much I read I feel like I am missing the 'important' works--whatever that means! :)
Kate--I have heard of Herland, and now that I've tried her work I will be looking for more. Perhaps this is the best place to start. I think most books are anthologies that have a variety of exceprts from her writing. I'll have to look for a book that includes Herland. Thanks for the suggestions!

Jaimie

Wow! How did I miss this one? I have never heard of either the title or the author! It looks fascinating though and I know I will read it. Thanks for another great review!

Danielle

Jaimie--You can find the story on Project Gutenberg. It's not long--maybe 15 pages and well worth a read!

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