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Jeanette

What a wonderful list! I love WWI fiction and nonfiction. It is my favorite time period to read about. Off the top of my head, without looking at my books and lists, I would recommend that you add One of Ours by Willa Cather.
I know I have mentioned this here before but I love Testament of Youth. When you read it you should also read her diaries and letters that have been published. It adds another dimension to the book.
Ok, here are a few more:
-Goodbye to all that by Robert Graves
-The Great War and Modern Memory by Paul Fussell
-A Soldier of the Great War by Mark Helprin

chartroose

Wow, Dani, thank you for this! I don't read many war novels, but some of these sound pretty good. You must not have liked "Atonement!"

Danielle

Jeanette--Lately this has been a favored period as well for me. Also the years between the wars--there's lots of wonderful fiction out there! I should really read Willa Cather since she is from the same place as me (Nebraska). Thanks for the other suggestions--I've only heard of the Helprin book and not read any of them.
Chartroose--I think most of the novels I read are during the war years but not really battlefield books. I did read and like Atonement, but I am saving it for part 2 of my list WWII--though I notice as I clicked through links to make sure they work that a few of these could easily be on that list as well!

Karen

Great list Danielle - thanks for these ideas. I absolutely loved the movie of A Very Long Engagement so I will have to give the book a go as well I think.

Marg

I really enjoy reading about this time as well. Really most books set against a war are things I enjoy. I have read one of the Faulks trilogy which I didn't really enjoy all that much. Should give him another go because I read another one of his books last year and enjoyed it. I have had the Pat Barker trilogy on my TBR list for years too.

I have the movie of A Very Long Engagement here to watch over the weekend.

The last two books that I have read with this setting were both by Australian authors. One was pretty forgettable (Black Diamonds by Kim Kelly) but the other was excellent (Barbed Wire and Roses by Peter Yeldham).

Evie

To this list, I would add Erich Maria Remarque's All quiet on the western front, Frederic Manning's The Middle Parts of Fortune, Ernest Hemingway's A Farewell to Arms and The Sun Also Rises, Ernst Junger's Storm of Steel and Henri Barbusse's Under Fire.

Evie

To this list, I would add Erich Maria Remarque's All quiet on the western front, Frederic Manning's The Middle Parts of Fortune, Ernest Hemingway's A Farewell to Arms and The Sun Also Rises, Ernst Junger's Storm of Steel and Henri Barbusse's Under Fire.

litlove

What a great list! It's not a well known book, but I loved Patrimony by Jane Thynne, all about looking into the mysteries of a first world war poet's life. And I've just begun Alfred and Emily by Doris Lessing, which is about her parents' marriage which she reckons was ruined by the war.

Your lists always impress me so, Danielle!

Max Cairnduff

What a fascinating list. I've not read a single one of them, which shows how much I've missed out. I shall definitely be looking into some of these.

I'd also suggest the 1971 Booker longlisted novel Goshawk Squadron, by Derek Robinson. A novel about a squadron of the Royal Flying Corp seeing active duty over France. It's a very interesting work, well written and hugely evocative. I write about it here: http://pechorinjournal.blogspot.com/2008/07/ce-nest-pas-magnifique-mais-cest-la.html

I'd also second the Hemingway recommendations above, I found A Farewell to Arms particularly effective, astonishingly bleak in places, very powerful.

Has anyone here read Verdun by Jules Romain? A French novel of family life in WW1 I believe, but I've not read it and would be interested to hear from anyone who had.

Isabel

I've read Barker's book. Very good. But I have seen other bloggers says that parts 2 and 3 are not at the same level as part 1.

rasputin

I agree that this is a pretty great list; I've been circling World War I novels for awhile, not knowing where to start.

If you're looking for a non-fiction book about WWI, I think a lot of people would suggest Paul Fussell's "The Great War and Modern Memory".

cathy

This is an excellent list; I have read about half of them, so will make my own list of the rest.

Birdsong is the book I think of first in WWI titles; my bookclub did it a few years ago and it is one of my all-time favourites. While it is part of a trilogy, it is by far the best of the three and is a great stand-alone.

Thanks for your always- interesting suggestions, Danielle.

Cath

I think I feel a new notebook coming on - one I can fill with WW1 and 2 book suggestions. :-) This time period is fast becoming a favourite of mine also and I really appreciate all of these recommendations.

Carl V.

Haven't read the book, but I absolutely loved the film version of A Very Long Engagement.

Kathryn

Great topic and discussion by all. I can see this is a list I'll be returning to for ideas of what to read.

Coincidentally, I'm currently reading a book set during WWI: "Greenmantle" by John Buchan; his sequel to "The 39 Steps." Though much more lighthearted than most of the books mentioned by others here, it's none the less quite enjoyable. A good summertime page-turner.

Kathryn

Great topic and discussion by all. I can see this is a list I'll be returning to for ideas of what to read.

Coincidentally, I'm currently reading a book set during WWI: "Greenmantle" by John Buchan; his sequel to "The 39 Steps." Though much more lighthearted than most of the books mentioned by others here, it's none the less quite enjoyable. A good summertime page-turner.

Cipriano

Danielle: I have read the Japrisot book in a former reading group I was involved with, and we had a lively discussion over it.
Among WW1 books that I have read, one of the best [by far] is one by Canadian historian Pierre Berton, entitled, "Vimy."
An incredibly relevant book, and one I highly recommend. However, powerfully disturbing... like watching the first parts of Saving Private Ryan over and over again... it helps though, to realize from time to time, that the best honor we can pay to those who have paid the ultimate price for us, is to read of their heroic exploits.
No monument, can ever be high enough, to commemorate what took place at Vimy Ridge!
After reading the book, I stood in the memorial, at Parliament Hill, here in Ottawa, and wept tears.

Ted

A Very Long Engagement is wonderful - isn't it? I liked it so much I couldn't bring myself to see the movie, which looks very changed. The Pat Barker trilogy is, to my mind, a fantastic rendering of World War I and its context. E. E. Cummings The Enormous Room is pretty good and All Quiet on the Western Front is also. I've heard that Ford Maddox Ford's Parades End is very good too, but I have never read it.

Danielle

I usually respond to each commenter individually, but then I usually don't get quite so many comments! Many thanks to everyone who left suggestions--there are lots of good books out there that I missed and I will be adding them on to this post and linking so everyone can read descriptions, some time this week. Like many of you I really am interested in reading about this period.

Tara

What a list! I'm definitely flagging this to come back to.

Lesley

I know I'm late, but I must second the suggestions above for 'All Quiet on the Western Front', and Graves's 'Goodbye to All That'. It's many years since I read the the Graves book, but it's stayed with me.
Likewise 'Birdsong'.

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