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catharina

Great list Danielle, I read To the River fairly recently and Olivia Laing has a has a very different voice. Looking forward to reading what you think of it. Arctic Dreams is one I'd like to read soon too.

Cath

I'm currently doing a very slow read of The Morville Hours and can confirm that it really is a marvellous and beautiful book.

JaneGS

So many intriguing sounding books. My dad read the Beatrix Potter bio and absolutely loved it--that's on my own personal nature book list.

Danielle

I am tempted to start that one next, but I like the idea of reading about Apples (my favorite fruit) during apple season. I do hope to get to it very soon, however. Deakin mentions Barry Lopez in his book, and I'd like to read about wintery locations. Will you be reading Arctic Dreams anytime soon?

Danielle

The Morville Hours does seem like a book to take slowly. I'm so glad to hear you are enjoying it. It looks like a book that touches upon many different topics. It is close to the top of my own reading pile now, too.

Danielle

Don't they sound good? I've got most of them already on my reading pile. The list is a bit of a hodgepodge but they all appeal to me at the moment. Hopefully I'll work my way through them pretty quickly (well, quickly for me is within the next year anyway).

bibliolathas

I really want to read the Olivia Laing one. I'm not much of a natural history reader but the literary aspects of that appeal. And apparently she's now working on Frank O'Hara, who interests me a lot.

LizF

I don't know why I am surprised that I have, or have read, so many of the books on your list!
As you know I am a fan of Roger Deakin's work and have both of those you mention and Waterlog, on my shelves although so far I have only read Notes from Walnut Tree Farm. I also have both The Morville Hours and The Morville Year and have them earmarked to start in the New Year (serious planning ahead as far as I am concerned!)
I don't have Tim Robinson's Aran book but I do have the first of his trilogy on Connemara, a place I know quite well (haven't been to Aran and probably never will because the only access is by boat and I get horribly seasick!)and he is a very atmospheric writer.
Funnily enough I am reading To The River at the moment and enjoying it although I am not very far in yet.
I think that I have mentioned Wild Hares and Hummingbirds by Stephen Moss to you before and can add Strands by Jean Sprackland which is about a year of beachcombing on a specific beach on the Lancashire coast, one that is very changeable and hides shipwrecks which will occasionally reappear only to vanish again - almost overnight.
As for gardening books - I love Monty Don's garden writing and he does beautiful books and if you can get hold of a hardback copy of Anna Pavord's The Tulip do - it is both gorgeous looking and fascinating reading about the tumultuous history of one of my favourite flowers.

catharina

Reading Arctic Dreams soon rather depends on how quickly I finish a series of eight essays by Robert Macfarlane and whether or not I then will be tempted to start reading his books (I have all three of them) first. He writes about nature too (and about Arctic Dreams in one of the essays), he was a friend of Roger Deakin. I would have to request Arctic Dreams through ILL and am waiting to see how things go first.

Joan Kyler

You and I are so alike in our reading attitudes. I'm interested in many areas of non-fiction, too, but when I sit down to read and relax, I almost always pick up a mystery, something that takes me far, far from my everyday life and something I can read fast. I have trouble setting aside chunks of quiet time for concentrating on non-fiction.

I am, however, currently reading Wildwood and a book called The Big House, the story of a many generational summer house on Cape Cod. Two of my favorite garden writers are the late Henry Mitchell and Elizabeth Lawrence. Both wrote passionately and literately about gardens, so I highly recommend both.

To read along with or after (or before) Silent Spring, you might like Always, Rachel, a collection of correspondence between Rachel Carson and a woman who wrote her a fan letter. They develop a close and long-term friendship and the letters provide insight into their personal lives.

LindaY

I picked up the Beatrix Potter bio after reading a couple of Susan Wittig Albert's cozy mysteries featuring Potter. It's a very dense biography but also extremely readable.

Stefanie

Wonderful list! I am going to have to save it as there are a number of books on it I haven't heard of that sound really good including that book on apples! Michael Pollan has a chapter on apples in botany of Desire if I am remembering correctly. It has been several years since I read it. It's a good book and he takes an interesting approach. I also loved Morville Hours. That is an excellent book about gardens. There is a book called "Founding Gardeners" that I want to read sometime. All the founders of the US were great farmers and gardeners and the book is about how their gardening and their work creating a country were intertwined.

Belle

What a marvelous list.

Just two nights ago I watched
"Miss Potter" the movie based on
the Linda Lear biography. It was
really lovely.

I will read anything by Michael
Pollan although so far it has
been only his food books.

I just checked my library's catalogue
for Deakin, Laing, and Swift and am
horrified to find nothing. I will be
on the lookout for those three.

Kathy

Some interesting choices here, Danielle. I've read Silent Spring and the Beatrix Potter biography, which I enjoyed a lot. Beatrix is one of my heroes. I might pick up The Morville Hours and/or one of the books on bees (I think they're fascinating). One book I enjoyed was The View From Lazy Point: A Natural Year in an Unnatural World by Carl Safina. Though it was a little disturbing to read about environmental problems, I loved his writing and overall I thought it was an excellent book. There's a new biography of Rachel Carson that just came out--On a Farther Shore--that I'd like to read, also. And I have Great Women Exploring Nature on my list to read, but haven't picked up a copy yet. Sounds like I need my own nature writing project!

Belle

Oh dear. My mistake. The movie
"Miss Potter" is not based on
Linda Lear's "Beatrix Potter: A
Life in Nature". They came out
the same year but are separate.
Sorry. That's how rumors get
started!

Judith

Danielle,
I'm so glad you wrote about another book by Roger Deakin. I'm very keen to read his book about trees now because this fall I'm compiling a naturalist's scrapbook of trees, based on my forest meanderings and study of each tree family--all as a way to reduce stress. It's working...maybe a little too well.

I'm hanging on to your list of ten.

Judith (Reader in the Wilderness)

Judith

I just realized that I can echo Danielle's enthusiasm for the biography of Beatrix Potter. It is a sensational book for people who enjoy the natural world.

Judith

Danielle

I didn't think I was into natural history either, but I find I very much like reading books about nature--it all started with essay reading--some of my favorite essays were by naturalists, so moving on to books seems like a natural progression. Interesing about Laing--I hadn't thought to look at her other books but now I will.

Danielle

I think I might well have gotten a number of these titles from you to begin with! :) I actually wasn't all that familiar with British naturalists, but I think perhaps half the authors on the list are actually British! I will get Deakin's Waterlog eventually, too--I'll start with Wildwood, but the other is on my wishlist. Wildwood appeals to me more at the moment. I also have Connemara on my wishlist--I think both titles have second parts to them? Let me know what you think of the Laing when you get further in--it looked really interesting. I have started reading Apples since we are in apple season now, but I was undecided between it and the Laing and Morville Hours. I think I am going to be on a little nonfiction kick for a while. I'm waiting for Wild Hares to come out in paper (you should see my wishlist at Amazon--it has over 800 titles--I kid you not and I wonder how many are there from your suggestions!). The others have been duly noted and I think I even have the Pavard on Tulips (library sale that one!). I'm so greedy when it comes to books--thanks for the ideas! :)

LindaY

Roger Deakin narrating "The Garden" is available on BBC4X until Sunday:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00t0zm2

LindaY

Oh, I am told if you love gardens you must read Beverley Nichols.

Danielle

I read in such a hodgepodge manner--on the bus or at the gym--places where I need something easy to get absorbed into as usually there are people talking and music--noise in any case, which means nonfiction can be hard if there is lots to take in detail-wise. I don't often get quiet at home reading time, which is what I need for nonfiction--hence my usual fiction reading. I am, however, very much in the mood for nonfiction--not sure if it is the season change or what. Since I finished reading the Deakin and it was a diary, I've picked up Mary Chestnut's Civil War Diary, which looks really interesting, but I hope won't be too hard to get into concentration-wise. I also started reading the book on Apples, which I think is going to be fairly light. I would love to read a book called Founding Brothers as my niece is studying the Continental Congress and the forming of the Constitution in school and as we were talking about it I thought it would be a good time to pick up a book like that. Wildwood looks really good--are you enjoying it? I love reading about trees and that seems to be Deakin's area from what I understood reading his Notes.. book. I have The Big House by the way--I wonder if you had suggested it to me before? I think I did buy it on someone's recommendation. Thanks for the garden book ideas--I will check them out--as well the book of correspondence by Rachel Carson--I'm sure my library has the latter. I'd like also to read her books on the seashore, too! So many good books! :)

Danielle

I didn't realize there was a cozy mystery series with Beatrix--I'll have to check those out. I have ordered the Potter bio--my library has it in hardcover, but as you say it is dense and I think I'd need time with it--also will be nice to have it in paperback. I've heard many good things about it, however.

Danielle

I have just started reading the Apples book--I think it is going to be a fun read--sort of social history but nature-style. Also I love apples and since it is apple season the timing seemed perfect. I'll let you know how it goes. I have yet to read Michael Pollan, but I thought Botany of Desire looked interesting, and I can't wait to read The Morville Hours--I think that one will be a slower going (in a good way) read. And I have requested Founding Gardeners from the library--I have seen Washington's plantation in Mount Vernon--very cool really to read about it--and I was in the mood too for something on American history (Colonial period in particular--so this totally fits the ticket). Thanks! :)

Danielle

I do love lists and am always happy to add to them. I watched the Beatrix Potter movie a few years ago and remember liking it--I'll have to read it again. I am dipping into her Peter Rabbit stories now. I had to break down and order all three of the latter as well as I couldn't find anything local either! I'm happy to have them, though, and Can't wait to read. Good luck in your search for them (interlibrary loan is always my fall back plan).

Danielle

I have a weird thing about bees-I've owned both books for several years now, so really must get around to reading them. Bee skeps are also a motif you find a lot in stitching--it's one of my favorite designs to stitch, so there is that angle, too. The Morville Hours looks quite tempting to me at the moment. I have added your other suggestions to my wishlist--they all sound good--especially the Safina, which is so timely and I should really read about conservation--even if it is disturbing--all the more so really! Yes, join me in a little nature reading! :)

Danielle

No worries! :) I imagine they cover much of the same ground! I still want to read the book and see the movie again.

Danielle

How cool--I love that project. I am a big fan of trees and have a most beautiful coffee table book about trees, which I should dig out and share here! I think trees are sort of Deakin's thing--there were some interesting bits about them in his Notes From Walnut Tree Farm, which makes me very eager to read Wildwood--it's a beautiful book by the way--so nicely designed!

Danielle

I broke down and ordered it so it is winging it's way to me even now! :)

Danielle

Do you know I actually heard part of that program last Sunday--it was pure serendipity as I was cleaning and thought I'd stream a little music and came upon the tail end of it. I will have to go back and listen to the whole show now. It was so cool to actually listen to him talk about his moat! :)

Danielle

I have glanced at his books in my library--we have several of them--and there are really nice reissues of them out now, too. Thanks for the reminder!

Joan Kyler

I am enjoying Wildwood. I wish I had known Roger Deakin. He seems like an unusual and interesting guy. I'm having trouble finding his other books, but I'll keep looking.

The Big House is new to me. I actually bought a copy to give my sister for Christmas and decided I'd like to read it, too, so I borrowed it from the library. I especially like it because the Big House is in an area of Massachusetts I know very well.

Belle

LindaY...I am currently
re-reading Mr. Nichols'
trilogy about his gardens
at Merry Hall.
He is entertaining as
always.

http://bellebookandcandle.blogspot.com/2012/09/next-up-laughter-on-stairs.html

Caroline

I'm late in commenting as I was on holiday. A little trip to the South of France.
This is an amazing list of books and I will have to look up all of them. They are the kind that will lead to many more I'm sure. To the River and The Morville Hours are those which tempt me the most.
Thanks so much for putting this together.

Joanne

To The River and The Morville Hours are on my TBR list. I've read the Beatrix Potter biography and loved it - I hope you enjoy it.

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