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Comments

Cath

Joyce Grenfell was a bit of a national institution back in the 50s and 60s. She spoke rather poshly and was known for monologues, often with her as a teacher reprimanding young children. She was, quite frankly, wonderful. Very very funny. I'm sure Youtube would provide you with a few things to look at. I'd love to get this book you've found!

Melwyk

This sounds like another winner :) Don't forget to add your links to the review roundup for the Postal Challenge if you'd like others to see them too, if you want to of course! http://indextrious.blogspot.ca/2013/01/postal-reading-challenge-january-march.html

Danielle

I'll have to look for something on Youtube about her--I would love to see her acting after reading a bit about her. She sounds quite famous, but I hadn't heard of her before coming upon this book of letters while browsing--I'm really interested to read more now. I know this was published in paperback--maybe you can find a cheap used copy locally.

Danielle

I didn't have so many books at first to choose from but now I seem to come across them left and right. Thanks for the link--although I am still reading--I have posted teaser sorts of posts on the books I've got underway, so I can at least add those--will check out, too, what everyone else is reading!

smithereens

I never heard of Joyce Grenfell but Virginia Graham (assuming it's the same person) rings a bell, she made witty, encouraging poetry for the home front during WW2, I reviewed her here: http://smithereens.wordpress.com/2011/03/20/virginia-graham-consider-the-years-1946/
If I can judge from this book, her letters must be lively indeed! Let us know.

Lyn

I bought a secondhand copy of this recently after Simon raved about it. I ave so much to read at the moment but I do want to get to it soon. I love reading letters.

Stefanie

What a wonderful find! Please do share when you come across something interesting. You know, I wonder what will happen in 50-60 years, will there be books of letters published between people living today? Are there still great correspondences taking place through the post? Or is it all being lost to email?

Val

Oh My ...do you have a treat in store....

http://www.goodreads.com/author/list/322428.Joyce_Grenfell

One of my favourites is "An Invisible friendship" by Joyce Grenfell and Katherine Moore

just google Joyce Grenfell and youtube if you'd like to see a selection of her work
eg
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FBFA_AJvrp4

Kathy

For some reason the name Joyce Grenfell sounds familiar to me--I feel I've come across her before in someone else's memoirs, or something like that. I will have to check out some of the YouTube links.

This does sound like a gem of a book. How fun.

LizF

Oh you have a treat in store, Danielle!
I'm not surprised that Joyce Grenfell isn't all that well known in the US as she was very, very English and, as Cath says, quite posh! She is however very, very funny both in her writing and her acting and monologues - there is a very well known monologue called 'George - Don't Do That!' in which she plays the part of a nursery school teacher which I remember with great pleasure.
Really must go in search of a copy of this book as it looks wonderful!

Simon T

This is on my 50 Books To Read list - I love it, but (scandalously) have only listened to the audio book.

Danielle

Yes, I think she is indeed the same woman--she was a writer, too. How cool that you have read her and that she wrote poetry--it sounds like the right era. After reading these comments I am quite excited now to read the book of letters. Thanks for the link--I'll check it out!

Danielle

I see that this was published in a paperback format, so I might by a used copy as well as the copy I have out from ILL is a big hardcover--not something easy to carry around with me. Now that I've had a chance to check it out, I think it would be worth owning. I hadn't realized Simon read it recently, so I will check out what he had to say about it, too. I love reading letters as well and have a little pile of various books by my bedside.

Danielle

I wonder, too. Maybe books of emails will be published instead? That's sort of depressing really--nowhere near as romantic as the idea of letters crossing in the mail. I wonder how many letters really do get mailed a year? I want to become a better letter writer--certainly the intro to this book has inspired me--will try and be more creative in my missives! :) Wouldn't it be fun to publish a book of postcard correspondence--complete with the pictures of the fronts of the postcards?

Danielle

Another book to add to my wishlist (actually I am very tempted to order a paper copy of the book you mention as well as the one I have checked out from the library. Both can be had used and fairly cheaply. I can see I have stumbled upon something good! Thanks for the links!

Danielle

It's entirely likely that you came across her in your reading. She sounds like she was quite famous. It's nice when you happen upon something this good unexpectedly!

Danielle

Hi Liz! (Hope all is well--I was wondering how you were!). I am curious now to hear her speak/see her act. I will be looking her up on Youtube I think! I'll look for the one you mention. I am just about convinced now to look for a copy of this book to own and return the library copy!

Danielle

I think this would be fun to listen to on audio from the sounds of things. How did I miss it on your list of 50 books--did you just add it recently? I am so glad to hear the book is good--I can't wait to get into the letters now! (The intro already had me hooked, though....).

litlove

I love the idea of this but don't know how anyone prevents themselves from just dipping into a book of letters. I'd be afraid of reading all the ones that just talk about the weather and how the washing got wet again! But Joyce Grenfell was a complete hoot, so I'll bet her letters are most amusing.

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