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Harriet Devine

As a Londoner (though I don't live there now) I had no idea there was a difference between the underground and the tube -- or rather in the names. I see the point, but I very much doubt if you'd find many people who were careful enough to use them differently even if they knew. Also, it's very common to switch from one to the other in the course of a journey. Very interesting to learn all this - thanks!

LizF

Absolutely fascinating Danielle! I had no idea about a lot of that even though I cheerfully swop around from line to line when I am in London on visits.
I must get hold of a copy of this book to pass on to my son who uses the Tube/Underground to get to work each day as I am sure that he will be as interested as I am although he uses the Northern Line to get from Finchley to Kentish Town.

LindaY

Ah, then all of the "T" in Boston is "underground" and not "tube" (unless the new Orange line is built in a tube method). The T was all cut-and-cover, and really, someone needs to do a book of the history of the T.

Your books sound fascinating! I may have to pull out WALK THE LINES.

Stefanie

A very educational book and post! I learned the difference between tube and underground and the origin of "commute." Do you have a favorite in the series yet or are you going to reserve that until you read all of the books?

Danielle

I can't imagine anyone giving it much thought at all really or even paying attention to which are mostly underground and which are more on the surface but it is interesting to read about--LOL. I hadn't thought about how or why it was like it is, and the idea of what sits on top--not surprising that the wealthier areas wouldn't want trains running through their neighborhoods! Total trivia about the distinction between Tube and Underground--I like how each author does a slightly different take on whichever Line she or he writes about--it gives a different take on what London is like. I wish I could go back and visit again....

Danielle

I thought it was great fun to take the Underground when I was in London--what a wonderful public transport system they have. I wonder if most Londoners think it works well or if they get frustrated by crowds and the commute? I've not yet read the book about the Northern Line. I was trying to read them in some sort of order but now I just randomly choose since I want to read all of them this year. I even bought a London A-Z guide--one of those spiral flip books that has the whole of London in it thinking I would follow the line on the map, but I have not looked at it in ages--must pull it out and use it after all the trouble I went to to get it!

Danielle

I have never been to Boson. Do you ride the "T" often? Is it a good system? Omaha has really deplorable public transport--from someone who uses it every day--only city buses that do not go out to all parts of the city as we are now so sprawled! I should really pull out Walk the Lines, too, and now that I am well into these books, though since I am reading them pell mell maybe I will wait to read it after the fact.

Danielle

There you have your daily dose of trivia and then some! I think I like the Mabey the best so far, about the Metropolitan Line, but I also liked Heads and Straights which was more memoir-ish and not really at all about the Underground line except how it had to do with where she had been living at the time. It is fun to see how each author approaches their subject and how much they vary. But we'll see at the end which ones end up being most memorable to me.

LindaY

Dani, am glad you started talking about the tube (Underground, whatever), because I started WALK THE LINES last night and am not out of the first chapter and love it. Amusing and with trivia all at one time. And the difference between "underground" and "tube" came up almost immediately!

LindaY

Well, I used to when I lived close enough to Boston to visit. :-) Tourists go to Boston and complain about the drivers being "crazy." That's because the only people who drive in Boston are the ones who have to (cops, taxi drivers, etc.), tourists, and crazy people. Everyone else takes the T because it goes everywhere you need it to go--want to go to the JFK library? Red Line south. Or the John Adams house? Red Line south to Braintree. Revere Beach? Blue Line east to Revere Beach. Harvard Square? Red Line west to Alewife, get off at Harvard. Or MIT if you like. Museum of Science? Green Line to Science Park. Downtown? Washington or State T-stops. Fanueil Hall? Green Line Government Center and walk down the steps--if it's not at a T-station it's a short walk from one.

LizF

We visited Cape Cod for a week about ten years ago and had a couple of day trips to Boston and absolutely loved the T. It was brilliant and took us everywhere we wanted to go and at that time seemed to be very reasonably priced.
I would love to get a chance to visit Boston again - we all loved it.

LizF

I do enjoy using the underground when I am in London for visits - it is just so easy to get about. But I hate it if I have to use it in rush hour - the crush really bothers me (I would be no good living in Japan where you see station staff literally forcing people onto trains with boards!)

Danielle

Ha--how cool that the author talked about those same differences. Now you make me want to pull my own copy out as well... ;)

Danielle

I would love to go to Boston--hopefully I will someday. I love east coast cities--so much history. And someday I want to live somewhere with GOOD public transport!

Danielle

Oh, man. Tokyo is one of the largest cities in the world, isn't it? For the longest time I had no desire to travel to Japan, but more and more I find I would love to see it! Not so sure about a public transport where they shoehorn people in, however! :)

Danielle

Now Boston is a place I think I could happily live. At least I hope to travel there someday. And it sounds like they have a most excellent public transport system, too!

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