My Photo

Bookish Places

Categories

Blog powered by Typepad

« The Stepford Wives by Ira Levin | Main | November 3: Weekend Reading Notes »

Comments

Readerlane

Your comfort reads sound delightful. I didn’t know Mary Norton wrote for adults, too. I’ve been enjoying some Mary Stewart books with Thornyhold and am halfway through Stormy Petrel. I’ve got the Ivy Tree, too, stashed on my Kindle for later. It sounds intriguing with the “double” theme. I may have read it years ago but don’t recall much about it. And Every Eye sounds like one for my TBR. They all sound good actually.

I liked Howard’s End is on the Landing. I hear she has a new one Jacob’s Room is Full of Books and I’m looking forward to reading it when it’s available in the US. I just read this tempting review with another bookshop book (and the other one looks great, too): https://www.washingtonpost.com/entertainment/books/this-librarian-loves-ancient-manuscripts-and-wants-you-to-love-them-too/2017/10/25/a89e89b6-b8ef-11e7-a908-a3470754bbb9_story.html?utm_term=.bb7deeb3325b

LindaY

I have the book BOOK, but have not yet read it. I'm reading Mark Kurlansky's PAPER, which is, predictably, mostly about books! The book about libraries sounds sensational.

Pam

Just clicked back to your review of the Mary Norton short stories and now, of course, I need to find a copy. They sound wonderful.

Readerlane

Wanted to add my prompt for Nov is Now for Something Completely Different — haven’t figured out what that will be yet. Dec is similar (somewhat) to yours for this month: Cozy Reading...which will probably be an old favorite. I’ve enjoyed this year of prompts as a way of giving each months’ reading its own focus...

Danielle

I really wish Mary Norton had written more for adults, but I must say I loved all those 'Borrower' stories when I was a kid! I didn't manage to get to Thornyhold last month, but maybe I will still pick up one of her books this year. I love stories with doppelgangers--I wouldn't mind rereading The Ivy Tree. And I had no idea Susan Hill had come out with another book about books/reading, so must go and check that out. Thanks for the heads up! I guess I should really read her first book...first! Now to check out the link you shared.

Danielle

I have added the Kurlansky to my wishlist--I wanted it when it first came out but I tend to avoid hardcovers as much as I can--now it is out in paperback. How wrote "Book"--impossible to search on amazon as is! :)

Danielle

I *loved* those stories and can very warmly recommend them. I hope you enjoy them as much as I did (and will again as the book sits on my nightstand now).

Danielle

I think my prompts have been the one reading plan I have actually completed this year and will do it again next year. I think I am going to just have random phrases (like the suggestions I got a while back) and will pull them from a hat to put them in order. It is fun to pick and choose from a theme each month.

iliana

The ones you chose for your bookish appreciation sound wonderful! I should make a plan like Susan Hill and maybe get to my shelf sitters one of these days!

Readerlane

That sounds like a fun twist—a way to keep things fresh. The themes have been fun, and some of my best reading this year came from the prompts. Thanks again for this cool idea :)

Danielle

You are most welcome-I love the idea that something I am doing inspired someone else to make it their own as well. Will you do it again? I have loved hearing your monthly themes, too! It is nice to mix things up a bit and think about other books you might overlook.

Danielle

I think about that, too--only reading from my own shelves for a year. I wonder if I could even do it for a month--hah! I do read mostly from my own book collections, but I like taking library books home, too. I hope to read several of these this month.

Readerlane

Yes definitely to the mixing things up a bit. I may do the themes again next year—but I usually don’t plan this far in advance so probably won’t get organized until the end of December :)

LindaY

LOL. It's THE BOOK, actually, and the author is Keith Houston.

Kathy

I loved Susan Hill's book--possibly because I'm incurably nosy about other people's bookshelves :).

It's funny that you mention The Ivy Tree. I just reread it recently, and even with the presence of horses, I just don't care for the story that much. It won't ever be a favorite.

Danielle

Thanks! That helps narrow things down. Now I am going to have to see if I can find a library copy--it looks interesting!

Danielle

I think I will enjoy the Hill book, only it seems someone who read it was saying she has some decided opinions on what she likes and doesn't and will say so. I have this fear that a much loved book will be shot down by her. I know--so silly, but it does keep me from picking it up. I guess I could skip an essay that seems overly critical?! When I read that Stewart the first time it was not a favorite of mine either, but I might get on better with it a second time around!

Danielle

I get anxious when it comes to reading plans. And part of me thinks what a messy reading year I have had and am ready to start anew. Sort of silly, and I will get a second (or fourth or fifth...) wind before the holidays to clean things off the night table. But it hovers there in the back of my mind--not a set plan but 'ideas'--lol.

Buried In Print

I've been thinking about Mary Stewart lately because I have been revisiting some of my grandmother's reading this year and collecting some copies of older books that she had on her shelves, and Stewart was there! The Mary Norton stories sound good: I'm not sure I've ever seen a copy, but I've always loved the title, atlhough I hadn't taken into account the financial side of it - just thought of toast (and I had forgotten how much you loved them)!

Danielle

You're welcome and I look forward to hearing what you come up with next year, too.

Danielle

I have put in a library request for The Book!

Danielle

I think Mary Norton only wrote one adult book, and that was the story collection and Virago might have been the only publisher to issue them as a collection--since then long out of print. Pity really as they are so good. I can totally see her writing being published by Persephone Books. Toast is my favorite. Or, one of my favorites. Avocado on toast, PB on toast, jam on toast, chocolate on toast, honey on toast.... Yum. And I got the juvenile story about cats by Mary Stewart you mentioned--came in as an ILL and I will bring it home this weekend! ;)

Readerlane

My impression is that you have a lot of ideas for your reading plans which I admire. I tend to the slapdash approach which is partly why it was fun to try something different, and the themes were open-ended enough that I never felt my choices were too boxed in. I’m in the midst of sorting through books now, and maybe I’ll get some ideas for possible next year themes as a fringe benefit. It has been fun hearing your possibilities and choices this year and theming along :)

The comments to this entry are closed.

Books Read in 2020

Books Read in 2019

Books Read in 2018

Books Read in 2017

Books Read in 2016

Books Read in 2015